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Old May 8th, 2010, 04:11 AM
Vendettius Vendettius is offline
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Default Connection loss after power failure

I have a WNDR330 wireless netgear router, after last nights power outage from a storm I have been unable to access the internet with either my desktop(wired) or my laptop(wireless). I am able to connect to my local home network but not internet. Also I am able to connect to the internet by connecting directly to my modem. All of my equipment was pluged into a surge protector. Ive also tried resetting the factory defaults of the router and basically reinstalling my network. Still I am only able to connect to my local network and not the internet as well. Please help me troubleshoot this.

Thanks
-JB
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Old May 8th, 2010, 04:45 AM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

Wrong area
moving to 3700 discussion area
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Old May 8th, 2010, 04:48 AM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

Next time invest on APC backup UPS. surge protector will still kill the unit with many ways, also cheap surge protector will damage too.

seems like some happen to the unit.
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Old May 8th, 2010, 07:18 AM
Vendettius Vendettius is offline
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

I do have an APC back up, Im using a APC Back-UPS ES BE450G
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Old May 8th, 2010, 07:31 AM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

But if router was hooked in surge side it will not help, unless it was hooked battery side

all in all some failed

contact support
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Old May 8th, 2010, 10:08 AM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vendettius View Post
I do have an APC back up, Im using a APC Back-UPS ES BE450G
Read its numeric specs. Where does that APC list each type of surge and protection from that surge. It doesn't. Many are told a surge protector is surge protection. That is enough to know when retail propaganda 'does not lie'.

View its spec numbers. Hundreds of joules. How does it stop surges that are hundreds of thousands of joules? It doesn't. But again. That is numbers. Those who know without learning must ignore every number.

Now you had damage. Of course. Surge protection is always - always - about where energy dissipates (ineffective protectors such as the APC will not discuss this). Either energy is harmlessly absorbed in earth. Or that energy is inside the building hunting for earth destructively via appliances. You saw what happens - without or without plug-in protectors. It found earth destructively via your router. Worse, plug-in protectors can give that surge even more paths to find earth destructively via nearby electronics.

The most common incoming source of surge currents is AC mains. You must have a 'whole house' protector located there. Effective protectors are as short as possible to earth ground (ie 'less than 10 feet'). And distant from protected electronics. That separation increases protection - and other reason the APC is not effective.

Even less effective is that UPS. Its joules could not be closer to zero. But if its joules are just above zero, then the retail propaganda can call it 100% protection. And so many will only believe what they are told to believe ... and ignore those numbers. How does its hundreds of joules absorb surges that are hundreds of thousands of joules? That is what another here has told you - by just ignoring the numbers.
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Old May 8th, 2010, 10:27 AM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

when using UPS.. two thing in mind

SURGE section= it ONLY stops from spikes but does not protect from burn out.

Sag = when voltage drop then your country you are in. Most sensitive equipment can damages by this which SURGE will not protect

UPS section= It does two function. Protect from Spikes and Burn out.

In general, printer or any HIGH Voltage equipment is not allowed on UPS side.
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Last edited by jmizoguchi; May 8th, 2010 at 11:02 AM.
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Old May 8th, 2010, 10:45 AM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmizoguchi View Post
when using UPS.. two thing in mind

SURGE section= it ONLY stops from spikes but does not protect from burn out.

Burn out = when voltage drop then your country you are in. Most sensitive equipment can damages by this which SURGE will not protect

UPS section= It does two function. Protect from Spikes and Burn out.

In general, printer or any HIGH Voltage equipment is not allowed on UPS side.
little revision, its 'Brown out' not burn out. typically happens when there is a large power draw and the voltage in the area drops, sometimes significantly.

Also Generally high Amperage devices should not be on a UPS because it can drain the battery quite quickly. All devices should run off of the same voltage, it is the amperage draw that is different.

back to the origional post. do you get any lights at all on your wan port?

I would reset the router with the reset button on the bottom, reset your modem, and cross your fingers. It is very weird that just the wan section would give out as technically all 5 ports are on the same switch internally and if there is a problem with one they should all be having a problem.
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Old May 8th, 2010, 10:51 AM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

ops... miss typo there.. Sag is what I meant.. although there is more on what protect from

at least we are on same page

Here good white paper from APC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uninter...e_power_supply
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Last edited by jmizoguchi; May 8th, 2010 at 11:03 AM.
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Old May 8th, 2010, 07:31 PM
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Default Re: Connection loss after power failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmizoguchi View Post
SURGE section= it ONLY stops from spikes but does not protect from burn out.
Sag = when voltage drop then your country you are in. Most sensitive equipment can damages by this which SURGE will not protect
1) No surge protector stops spikes. Myth promoted by less responsible companies claim its hundreds of joules will protect from surges that are hundreds of thousands of joules. Obviously not. Protector will stop what even three miles of sky could not? Of course not. So many beleive that myth only because it comes in what looks like an honest white paper.

2) Sags - also called brownouts or low voltage may be harmful to refrigerators, furnace, air conditioner, etc. And is not (and must not be) harmful to electronics. Again, numbers. Voltages below 5% are harmful to motorized appliances. Therefore utilities maintain tight voltage control.

All electroncis are required to work even when incandescent bulbs dim to 50% intensity. Defined in various manufacturer specs. Required in international design standards even 40 years ago. That chart for low voltage is quite blunt about low voltages - sags. Says, "No Damage Region" in capital letters.

And yet still so many will believe brownouts or sags are destructive to electronics because that APC myth sells more APC products.

Nothing in that wikipedia articles says low voltages cause damage. The UPS for household electronics is for data protection. Nothing more.

OP has destructive symptoms of a surge - not a sag. If damage is by a surge, the OP must install protection so that future surges will not enter the building. His symptoms are typical of a surge incoming on AC mains that plug-in protectors did not and should not protect from. Sags do not cause hardware damage.
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